Cosmopolitan

Battle of Britain radar station used to spot incoming bombers is for sale for almost £1 million

The Gazette Staff

A historic Battle of Britain radar station converted into an ultra-modern holiday home has gone on the market for almost £1million. 

The Old Radar Station was built in St Boniface Down, near Ventnor, on the highest point of the Isle of Wight as the threat of World War Two loomed in 1938.

The station in the southern-most location of the British Isles was crucial in helping the RAF defeat the Luftwaffe in 1940 as it detected approaching enemy planes. The station was twice bombed due to its strategic importance.

The Old Radar Station (pictured) on St Boniface Down, near Ventnor, is located at the highest point of the Isle of Wight

The Old Radar Station (pictured) on St Boniface Down, near Ventnor, is located at the highest point of the Isle of Wight

The Old Radar Station (pictured) on St Boniface Down, near Ventnor, is located at the highest point of the Isle of Wight

The property offers breathtaking 360 degree views across the island and the English Channel (pictured: Deck chairs on the property's roof)

The property offers breathtaking 360 degree views across the island and the English Channel (pictured: Deck chairs on the property's roof)

The property offers breathtaking 360 degree views across the island and the English Channel (pictured: Deck chairs on the property’s roof)

The station was built in 1938 in the southern-most location of the British Isles as the threat of World War Two loomed

The station was built in 1938 in the southern-most location of the British Isles as the threat of World War Two loomed

The station was built in 1938 in the southern-most location of the British Isles as the threat of World War Two loomed

It has a distinctive living room framed in aluminium with an island unit designed to look like an aircraft wing (pictured: The view south)

It has a distinctive living room framed in aluminium with an island unit designed to look like an aircraft wing (pictured: The view south)

It has a distinctive living room framed in aluminium with an island unit designed to look like an aircraft wing (pictured: The view south)

It was crucial in helping the RAF defeat the Luftwaffe in 1940 as it detected approaching enemy planes. The station was twice bombed due to its strategic importance

It was crucial in helping the RAF defeat the Luftwaffe in 1940 as it detected approaching enemy planes. The station was twice bombed due to its strategic importance

It was crucial in helping the RAF defeat the Luftwaffe in 1940 as it detected approaching enemy planes. The station was twice bombed due to its strategic importance

One of its standout features is a huge roof terrace from which to enjoy the countryside in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty

One of its standout features is a huge roof terrace from which to enjoy the countryside in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty

One of its standout features is a huge roof terrace from which to enjoy the countryside in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty

It also played a key role during the D-Day landings monitoring both ship and aircraft movements, as well as tracking V1 flying bombs and ‘doodlebugs’.

The station was decommissioned by the RAF in 1961 but continued to be used as a communications centre for the Civil Aviation Authority until its closure in 1991.

It remained derelict until it was bought by Sarah Cheeseman and Howard Carter, an architect and interior designer who have converted it into a four bedroom holiday home.

The property offers breathtaking 360 degree views across the island and the English Channel.

The station was decommissioned by the RAF in 1961 but continued to be used as a communications centre for the Civil Aviation Authority until its closure in 1991 (pictured: The bathroom)

The station was decommissioned by the RAF in 1961 but continued to be used as a communications centre for the Civil Aviation Authority until its closure in 1991 (pictured: The bathroom)

The station was decommissioned by the RAF in 1961 but continued to be used as a communications centre for the Civil Aviation Authority until its closure in 1991 (pictured: The bathroom)

The station played a key role during the D-Day landings monitoring both ship and aircraft movements, as well as tracking V1 flying bombs and 'doodlebugs' (pictured: The dining area)

The station played a key role during the D-Day landings monitoring both ship and aircraft movements, as well as tracking V1 flying bombs and 'doodlebugs' (pictured: The dining area)

The station played a key role during the D-Day landings monitoring both ship and aircraft movements, as well as tracking V1 flying bombs and ‘doodlebugs’ (pictured: The dining area)

It remained derelict until it was bought by Sarah Cheeseman and Howard Carter, an architect and interior designer who have converted it into a four bedroom holiday home (pictured: One of the bedrooms)

It remained derelict until it was bought by Sarah Cheeseman and Howard Carter, an architect and interior designer who have converted it into a four bedroom holiday home (pictured: One of the bedrooms)

It remained derelict until it was bought by Sarah Cheeseman and Howard Carter, an architect and interior designer who have converted it into a four bedroom holiday home (pictured: One of the bedrooms)

In accordance with planning permission, it can't be lived in full time, and must be used as 'holiday accommodation' only

In accordance with planning permission, it can't be lived in full time, and must be used as 'holiday accommodation' only

In accordance with planning permission, it can’t be lived in full time, and must be used as ‘holiday accommodation’ only

It has a distinctive living room framed in aluminium with an island unit designed to look like an aircraft wing.

One of its standout features is a huge roof terrace from which to enjoy the countryside in an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

Next to the drive is a grass-covered bunker which was part of a later radar system and has been turned into a store room.

The property has 3.4 acres of fenced downland.

The property has 3.4 acres of fenced downland. It has emerged on the market with estate agent Spence Willard with a guide price of £995,000

The property has 3.4 acres of fenced downland. It has emerged on the market with estate agent Spence Willard with a guide price of £995,000

The property has 3.4 acres of fenced downland. It has emerged on the market with estate agent Spence Willard with a guide price of £995,000

'The home is located on the high point of the island and the unrivalled views of the countryside and sea are just stunning,' said Zadie Margham, of Spence Willard

'The home is located on the high point of the island and the unrivalled views of the countryside and sea are just stunning,' said Zadie Margham, of Spence Willard

‘The home is located on the high point of the island and the unrivalled views of the countryside and sea are just stunning,’ said Zadie Margham, of Spence Willard

'It has to be a holiday home but this doesn't mean the owner can't spend significant chunks of the year here, they just need to have a main home elsewhere,' Ms Margham added

'It has to be a holiday home but this doesn't mean the owner can't spend significant chunks of the year here, they just need to have a main home elsewhere,' Ms Margham added

‘It has to be a holiday home but this doesn’t mean the owner can’t spend significant chunks of the year here, they just need to have a main home elsewhere,’ Ms Margham added

'This is a rare opportunity to enjoy a truly unique home, encompassing a fascinating heritage and a secluded setting,' said Ms Margham

'This is a rare opportunity to enjoy a truly unique home, encompassing a fascinating heritage and a secluded setting,' said Ms Margham

‘This is a rare opportunity to enjoy a truly unique home, encompassing a fascinating heritage and a secluded setting,’ said Ms Margham

In accordance with planning permission, it can’t be lived in full time, and must be used as ‘holiday accommodation’ only.

It has emerged on the market with estate agent Spence Willard with a guide price of £995,000.

The present owners let it as holiday accommodation for £300 per night.

Zadie Margham, of Spence Willard, said: ‘The Old Radar Station was a derelict building before its current owners transformed it.

‘They have breathed new life into the historical building by converting the disused station into a luxury holiday home.

The Old Radar Station was one of 20 ‘Chain Home’ coastal early warning radar stations built by the Royal Air Force (RAF) before and during the Second World War to detect enemy aircraft (pictured: The frontline station in World War Two)

The property boasts four bedrooms, a roof terrace and a kitchen/living room. The present owners let it as holiday accommodation for £300 per night

The property boasts four bedrooms, a roof terrace and a kitchen/living room. The present owners let it as holiday accommodation for £300 per night

The property boasts four bedrooms, a roof terrace and a kitchen/living room. The present owners let it as holiday accommodation for £300 per night

‘The home is located on the high point of the island and the unrivalled views of the countryside and sea are just stunning.

‘It has to be a holiday home but this doesn’t mean the owner can’t spend significant chunks of the year here, they just need to have a main home elsewhere.

‘This is a rare opportunity to enjoy a truly unique home, encompassing a fascinating heritage and a secluded setting.’

The Old Radar Station was one of 20 ‘Chain Home’ coastal early warning radar stations built by the Royal Air Force (RAF) before and during the Second World War to detect enemy aircraft.

Source : Mail Online

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