Facebook will pay creators to have their TikTok-style videos shown in the main news feed

Facebook is promoting Reels as an alternative, with films delivered up in a manner that appeals to younger viewers while still appearing on platforms where marketers have spent decades—Facebook and Instagram.
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Facebook will pay creators to have their TikTok-style videos shown in the main news feed.

Facebook is bringing its short-form Reels videos into its main News Feed, doubling down on the feature as TikTok's competition grows.

To incentivize influencers to focus on Reels, the business will give select artists a new payment incentive if they post videos on Facebook or Instagram, where Reels initially appeared in August 2020. In a blog post announcing the Reels expansion, Facebook limited the incentive program to an invite-only group for the time being and did not provide any further specifics on the exact structure of the benefits.

For Facebook, there's a lot on the line. In less than four years, TikTok has grown to a billion monthly users, attracting a youthful, mostly adolescent audience. TikTok's rise is one of the few genuine existential challenges to Facebook's domination of the social media environment, especially since young people have abandoned its eponymous app and Instagram's growth has slowed.

With Reels, Facebook has attempted to challenge TikTok by redesigning Instagram to focus on the videos. It's unknown how effective Reels has been on Instagram, and Facebook hasn't provided any figures, which might indicate that Reels is struggling to gain traction.

Reels' inclusion in Facebook's News Feed expands its potential audience considerably, but it also exposes the videos to an audience that may not be as interested in them. Every day, almost 2 billion individuals use Facebook, which is nearly double the number of people who use Instagram. However, Facebook's user base has become older: According to a recent Pew study, just 77 per cent of individuals aged 30 to 49 and 73 per cent of those aged 50 to 64 use Facebook, while fewer than a quarter of adults in both age categories use TikTok.

Every social media company is scrambling to help influencers be compensated in order to keep content pouring into its applications. Facebook has announced that it will pay $1 billion to artists between now and 2022 in order to retain them on its platform. TikTok, Snap, and YouTube are all fighting for funding.

Facebook is also experimenting with how it will add advertising to Reels, which is likely the most straightforward method for the company to monetise the films. Over the previous year, TikTok has placed advertising in its video stream, but sponsors have been hesitant due to their unfamiliarity with the brand and its participation in a political spat with China. TikTok unveiled numerous new marketing efforts only a day ago, including tools to better target advertisements and data to assess a campaign's efficacy, in the hopes of making advertisers more comfortable.

Facebook is promoting Reels as an alternative, with films delivered up in a manner that appeals to younger viewers while still appearing on platforms where marketers have spent decades—Facebook and Instagram.

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