An 85-year-old pensioner who was conned by rogue traders lost another £15,000 when fraudsters posing as police pretended to help her prosecute them.

The woman was cold called in July by a man claiming to be from the police after she lost money to rogue traders.

The fraudster told the victim, from Gillingham, Kent, that she needed to pay court fees in order to prosecute the crooks.

An 85-year-old pensioner from Gillingham, Kent, who was conned by rogue traders lost another £15,000 when fraudsters posing as police pretended to help her prosecute them

An 85-year-old pensioner from Gillingham, Kent, who was conned by rogue traders lost another £15,000 when fraudsters posing as police pretended to help her prosecute them

An 85-year-old pensioner from Gillingham, Kent, who was conned by rogue traders lost another £15,000 when fraudsters posing as police pretended to help her prosecute them

The pensioner went to multiple banks and post offices within a four-mile radius in Chatham Strood and Hempstead Valley with a ‘courier’ where she withdrew £15,000 cash and handed it over.

Kent Police officers are investigating the fraud and have issued an image of a man they wish to speak to in relation to the case.

Kent Police officers are investigating the fraud and have issued an image of a man they wish to speak to in relation to the case

Kent Police officers are investigating the fraud and have issued an image of a man they wish to speak to in relation to the case

Kent Police officers are investigating the fraud and have issued an image of a man they wish to speak to in relation to the case

A Kent police spokesman said: ‘The victim, an 85-year-old woman from Gillingham had lost money to rogue traders previously and was then cold called in July 2019 from a man claiming to be from the police and told that she needed to pay court fees in order to prosecute the suspects.

‘On 19 July, she went to various banks and post offices in Chatham, Strood and Hempstead Valley, accompanied by a ‘courier’ where she withdrew money totalling £15,000 and handed it over.

‘Officers would like to speak to the man in the image as he may have information about the incident.’

Investigating officer DS Marc Cananur said: ‘A police officer will never ask you to hand money over to them to support an investigation or ask you to transfer money to a safe account for fraud reasons.

‘If a person knocks on your door or rings and claims to be a police officer, do not allow them into your home if you do not think they are genuine.

‘Instead, take their details and contact 101 or 999.

‘A genuine police officer will not mind calling back or visiting at a later date when you have had a chance to verify who they are.’

What should you do if you think you have been scammed? 

1. Contact the company or person who took your money – this could be fruitless if it’s a scam, but it should be your first port of call.

2. If you bought something costing £100 or more on a credit card, you may be able to claim it back under a little-known law: Section 75. Once you’ve paid using a credit card, the card provider and retailer are locked into a legally binding contract, so if the retailer can’t or won’t refund you, you can raise the dispute with your card provider. 

3. If you can’t claim the money back via Section 75 you could try using the chargeback scheme. It’s a voluntary agreement by your debit or charge card provider to stand in your corner if anything goes wrong.

4. Unfortunately, if you’ve transferred the money using sites such as Moneygram, Western Union or PayPal, you generally can’t get your money back once you’ve handed it over.

Source: Money Saving Expert

Source : Mail Online

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